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Thread: Question for those with an anchor Trolley (ESP Yak Attack Trolley)

  1. #1
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    Default Question for those with an anchor Trolley (ESP Yak Attack Trolley)

    Hey fellas,
    Well after kayak fishing for longer than I can recall (think it's like 8 or 9 years) out of the same good ol yak, I've decide the Green Monster finally needs an anchor trolley. As much as I'd LOVE to throw down some cash and just buy a brand new yak, life is telling me to stfu and keep fishing what I got. So this will at least put something new on it...lol At any rate, I got an Anchor Trolley from a TKAA captain's bag a couple years back and was like this will be great for me to use this Spring when I might need to do some live lining for Bull Reds. so I took a look at my yak and I immediately came across a little bit of an issue. As you can see from the pics, my boat likes to get a little intimate with structure.

    IMG_20180211_212127_587.jpg

    I call them war wounds... she bears them with pride. But I wondered how the pulleys from the kit would stand up to me banging against pylons and the abrasive nature of my gunwales. I cold always just pull the front pulley off and plug the hole with the screw, but who wants to do that? And also, I am also worried about weakening the plastic where the bolts go through if I do that. Has anyone had any issues with their pulleys cracking or being jacked up? It's 20 bucks for a pair of new pulleys and a few bucks for paracord, so if they last me a season that isn't the worst thing.

    Just thought I'd ask the masses before I start plotting and drilling. LOL Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Aug 2010
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    Looks like dry rot to me Carl!


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  3. #3
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    Somehow I'd knew you'd find this post... I was hoping that sticking it under the Dry Dock it would be missed. WRONG! LOL

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Nanjemoy, MD & on a mountain in WV
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    I have 2 YakAttack LeverLock HD trolleys mounted. The pulleys are small and secured with 2 small bolts and a backing plate (HD model). I am confident they could be destroyed if rammed into structure.

    You could mount your pulleys a bit above or below that rub line. I was thinking along the same lines as you and decided to mount both trolleys (L&R) a bit high to avoid damage, with the line easier to reach from a high seat. There's enough stretch in the paracord to allow an anchor poll to slide by without rubbing. Here's one of the bow pulleys mounted on mine:

    trolley.jpg

  5. #5
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    Thanks Guns! I figured as much. I also thought about mounting it higher, but does the trolley stay off of the yak with it being so high? Not that it would have any functionality issues, I'm just wondering how it would look. LOL

  6. #6
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    Apr 2013
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    mytmouse,

    Mounting the front pulley of the trolley on the deck looks like a good solution to protect it from front impact dings.

    But here's another thought to protect the front pulley. Note that I have not done this. Just thinking about it based on my uses of trolleys, which admittedly is limited. I avoid anchoring as much as possible. Only one of my kayaks has a trolley and I rarely use it. But when I do, I have always trolleyed the anchor to the stern of the boat. The wind then swings the bow of the boat like a compass point directly downwind. That way I cast with the wind at my back and I don't have to throw lures or flies into the wind. If I trolleyed the anchor to the bow, the opposite would happen. The wind would turn the boat so that my bow faced directly into the wind. That's why I never trolley forward.

    That being the case, I could live very well with half of a trolley line. The front pulley would not have to go to the bow at all. It could end well before the bow creating a much shorter line and protecting the pulley from headlong impacts by the bow. As long as the line is within my reach, I could still trolley the anchor to the stern.

    Again, just another thought on the subject.

    Good luck.
    Mark

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  7. #7
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    Feb 2011
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    I use my YakAttack anchor trolley with my stakeout pole in shallow water fishing the flats...and I rarely ever bump my kayak on any structure...no side rash- this week I will use it to anchor up to catfish in Mattawoman Creek...never had any problem with my pulleys- traditionally mounted- works great— I sometimes anchor from the bow- sometimes from the stern...summertime using the stakeout pole- I get out and wade fish around the kayak on hard bottom at St. Jerome’s Creek...not so much anywhere else...
    Last edited by ronaultmtd; 02-13-2018 at 12:05 PM.
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  8. #8
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    Jan 2018
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    Nanjemoy, MD & on a mountain in WV
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    Quote Originally Posted by mytmouse View Post
    Thanks Guns! I figured as much. I also thought about mounting it higher, but does the trolley stay off of the yak with it being so high? Not that it would have any functionality issues, I'm just wondering how it would look. LOL
    I tested mounting locations (with paracord and gorilla tape) to achieve acceptable layout. Below my hull/deck line was too low for me to reach without leaning way over, so I chose above. Right now, the trolley line (paracord) tension is is adjusted to slide freely, but still snap back into position. With that amount of tension, a stakeout pole is free to slide from one end of the trolley to the other, without touching the hull. Amidships (photo 1), the stakeout pole can pull the trolley line out about 6" (under the weight of the leaning pole). At the bow pulley (photos 2&3), the line is still not touching:

    Trolley 1.jpgTrolley 2.jpgTrolley 3.jpg

  9. #9
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    Thank Mark... yeah I thought about that too, but I like to anchor at the bow so I face the waves most of the time. Just puts me at ease seeing what's coming I suppose. LOL


    Thanks for the pic and idea Guns! I didn't even think about taping the pulleys up before I install them. Looks like I have a project to work on this weekend!

  10. #10
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    My kayak gunwales look just like yours; nothing but scratches, rashes, and gashes. I mounted my pulleys up on the deck and haven't had to worry about them at all. The anchor trolley line however has been replaced once thanks to it getting frayed in spots where it was caught between my kayak and the structure I'm fishing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    But here's another thought to protect the front pulley. Note that I have not done this. Just thinking about it based on my uses of trolleys, which admittedly is limited. I avoid anchoring as much as possible. Only one of my kayaks has a trolley and I rarely use it. But when I do, I have always trolleyed the anchor to the stern of the boat. The wind then swings the bow of the boat like a compass point directly downwind. That way I cast with the wind at my back and I don't have to throw lures or flies into the wind.


    If I trolleyed the anchor to the bow, the opposite would happen. The wind would turn the boat so that my bow faced directly into the wind. That's why I never trolley forward.
    I too prefer anchoring off the stern, but if you've ever anchored in spots like the mouth of the bay, seaside creeks, or seaside inlets where you have heavy current, you'll quickly realize that a stern anchor isn't always a safe, smart idea. Hence it's nice to have a bow and stern trolley so you can choose based on conditions.

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