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Thread: Old Dogs can learn “new tricks”

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southern Maryland- Charles County
    Posts
    3,541

    Default Old Dogs can learn “new tricks”

    This past year I pretty much decided I would try to make my fishing as enjoyable as possible and go strictly with light spinning tackle, down size everything and enjoy smaller, more abundant fish...all my life I had chased bigger and bigger fish requiring heavier tackle...after satisfying all my personal “bucket lists” (I missed one - never broke the 1000 pounder) I decided to go back to my roots...so this year I am putting last year’s learning experiences into my bag of “tricks.” All single hooks on lures, and more barbless hooks for easier C&R with fewer gut hooked fish...and no mono or floro leaders in salt water.

    My favorite casting outfit is a 7’ St. Croix medium-light Mojo Inshore rod with a 2500 Shimano Stradics CI-4(+) Reel loaded with KastKing 10# braid...great for old farts throwing a 1/8 oz jighead swimbait or a mini crankbait...for tossing top water poppers I use a Shimano 3000 Sustain FG Reel with 20# Cabela’s Braid on a 7 foot medium action Shimano SE Inshore rod...this year the wife got me my Christmas present outfit I plan to fish hard and give an honest review- a Lews Mach Speed Stick 6’9” medium, all purpose rod with a Daiwa 2500 BG with 12# KastKing Braid...

    For catfishing I still use Abu NaCL Revo Toro low profile baitcasters loaded with 30# braid on 7’ medium heavy St Croix Avid X rods
    "Lady Luck" 2016 Red Hibiscus Outback
    "Wet Dream" 2011 yellow Ocean Prowler 13

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Arnold, MD
    Posts
    2,695

    Default

    Ron, sounds like a good plan! Light tackle is a blast and I get that but why no leaders? To me the leader is not entirely about abrasion resistance to the fish's mouth or surrounding rocks/obstacles but it's also a grab handle for dealing with the fish. Do you plan on wearing gloves?
    Guy who used to fish more.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southern Maryland- Charles County
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    3,541

    Default

    I wear fingerless gloves mostly for sun protection, but also against fish spines and grabbing Braid...last year I broke off at the knot where the braid and leader are paired on a big cow nose ray...since fish were biting I decided to just tie directly to the 10# braid...first cast was my first Maryland citation spotted sea trout of 24 1/2 inches...The SMOG crew was fishing together when I caught the trout...no Leader...and I caught four more Specks afterwards, so it seemed to me that the green colored braid had no effect on fish and the Albright knot on the jighead gives me a stronger, less things to fail, opportunity not to lose a fish...
    "Lady Luck" 2016 Red Hibiscus Outback
    "Wet Dream" 2011 yellow Ocean Prowler 13

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Clarksburg, MD
    Posts
    107

    Default

    Last year was a year of learning for me as well, only I went in the opposite direction. My usual outfits were 4 or 4 1/2" ultralight rods with 500 size reels and 2-4lb test. I purposefully went a little larger than I wanted to on reel sizes (4-5000) when buying my kayak rods/reels, but I would rather have the spool capacity available if I want it vs having to go out and buy a whole new reel. Santa did bring me a couple Daiwa 2000BG's to try out this year on a couple daiwa generation black rods I picked up overseas. Hopefully the hype around the BG reels is warranted. I used to be shimano all the way, but Daiwa has really been impressing me recently.
    "Fish on a Dish" - 2017 Jackson Big Tuna

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    St Mary's County
    Posts
    846

    Default

    I applaud going light weight but please remember that a long battle with a fish in hot water will have a higher probability of delayed mortality if released. When summer time rolls around think about stepping up the line weight to 8-10 pounds to let you get the fish in quicker. Still a lot of fun and who doesn’t like a green fish thrashing around the kayak.
    Mike
    Pro Angler 14 "The Grand Wazoo"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southern Maryland- Charles County
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    Default

    Mike- for the fishing we do I consider my light outfit the CI4(+) Stradics with 10#...still plenty of rod and reel...remember our battles with those damn CNRs? It caught three of my best fish this past year...seems like the biggest fish always hit the light rod...I only fish UL for the spring Rainbow trout in the fresh water lakes...
    "Lady Luck" 2016 Red Hibiscus Outback
    "Wet Dream" 2011 yellow Ocean Prowler 13

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    3,924

    Default

    Ron -

    I agree with you about 95%. I have done offshore fishing in the past and enjoyed the excitement, but am no longer interested in the huge time commitment and cost. I fished many times last year -- all with light tackle (ultralight to med-heavy rods) and spinning reels in the 1000, 2500, or 3000 size classes. That is my "fishing comfort zone" at this point in my life.

    Regarding the 5% difference in opinion, I am a firm believer in leaders. For much of my local fishing, a mono leader is sufficient, but when fishing in clearer waters, I choose fluorocarbon. I occasionally lose a fish from breakage at the line/leader knot (I use a double uni), but usually it breaks elsewhere. I too wear fishing gloves, bit still find that grabbing braided line directly can lead to skin cuts.

    I look forward to warmer weather and ice-free waters to resume fishing.
    John Veil
    Annapolis
    Native Watercraft Manta Ray 11 and Slayer Propel 10
    Member - Pro Staff team for Native Watercraft

    Author - "Fishing in the Comfort Zone" - light tackle fishing techniques for kayaks and small boats

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    8

    Default

    Sound like a great plan. I caught onto light tackle from learning to light tackle jig from my boat. When I got my kayak, I just used the same equipment. I primarily fish the Chesapeake Bay and it's tributaries. For the typical fish I catch from my kayak, 2500 Stradics and medium to medium/heavy rods are perfect. If I know that I will be targeting big fish, bring the appropriate tackle on my trip. I do prefer to use leader for the abrasion resistance and being able to grab it to handle fish. I use a triple surgeons knot and have never had a knot slip on me.
    2016 Hobie Outback
    Check Out My Fishing YouTube Channel
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4C...2vYTXcKm-3aGOg

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    lexington park
    Posts
    2,197

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    Can't abide fishing topwater lures with braid directly tied to spooks and poppers. It is so limp that it always seems to foul the front hooks. I prefer flourocarbon because it is stiffer and seems to make those lures work best.....bbut i'm cheap so I usually use 12-15lb mono.
    14.5 ft Sand colored Malibu X-Factor "the promise"
    2010 Hobie Outback "the Gift Horse II"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Perry Hall, MD
    Posts
    2,112

    Default

    Don't forget that the leader serves as a "line saver." You end up going through less braid, just replace the leader as it gets shorter.
    ______________________________________________

    Light Tackle Kayak Trolling the Chesapeake Bay, Author
    Light Tackle Kayak Jigging the Chesapeake Bay, Author
    Kokatat Pro Staff
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    2011 Ivory Dune Outback
    Alan

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