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Thread: Only in America

  1. #11

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    My mother is English and her brothers were big carp and pike fisherman in the UK. We used to fish Pymatuning lake in PA at a place called the Linesville Spillway. They had a big bridge where visitors would throw bread to feed thousands of carp. Every few years I head back there for some carp action.

    My parents also put grass carp in their pond when I was a kid to clean up the algae problem. They got to be about 3ft long and 10lbs. It was some serious fun catching those guys on dry flies and my 5wt fly rod. That'll get you ready for bonefish in the salt.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    columbia
    Posts
    610

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    I caught(snagged) a huge carp, 36" plus, and reported about this back in April-Fresh Water Thread, personal best. I was fishing from a 12 foot canoe in a Columbia area pond. Great pullage.

    Due to my shoulder surgery, which may limit my ability to load a canoe for a while, I may be forced to become a temporary shore fisherman for the first part of the season (I was told that I may be able to lift the bigger canoe by June).

    Shad from shore, and as the water warms up, pond Carp are a viable alternative. Gotta go back to my roots, a can of corn, a couple of rods in holders and a small folding seat.

    50 years ago one of my stoner friends took me out to upper Lake Roland (minor trespassing to park) to fish for "rainbow trout." It turns out they were schooling Carp, and we caught them in large numbers. Like Mark, I used a Mitchell 300 reel that I got from E.J. Korvettes on Route 40 and a Sears "Ted Williams" fiberglass rod. And my reel still works, too.

    Somewhere on YouTube there is a video of Lefty fly fishing on the upper Susquehana for Carp with nymphs and extremely long leaders. The trick was to find actively feeding Carp, not those sleeping stationary fish, and gently dropping the nymphs in front of the fish with a curved cast. My arm hurts just thinking of fly casting right now!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    lexington park
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    2,197

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    Living on the Columbia River,OR, carp were plentiful and not helpful.....silting areas that had been productive fishing areas for other species.
    My main fishing buddy was the son of Italian immigrants (Daltoso). One day i was being derogatory about carp....i had seen some salted in a European fish shop in Seattle....and anyone who would eat them.
    He put me in my place tellingme of all the great carp dishes he ate as a child and when visiting "the old country". His favorite was a pasta sauce with a tomato and carp base.....something fixedfor me at a later date. Pretty good stuff
    14.5 ft Sand colored Malibu X-Factor "the promise"
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  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Perry Hall, MD
    Posts
    2,112

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    I used to target them. I know a location they get as big as trucks. They seem to spawn there in the spring and for several years I'd make a dough bait, chum the area with it and put out a few lines. There's definitely a technique to it on a kayak because the lines need to be dead still, which requires at least 2 anchors. But I'll tell ya, oh boy do they fight. They are like bulls. I've not spent as much time fishing for them because prime striper season coincides with prime carp season. Carp are a bit easier to catch and you can really bend a pole on one so I don't understand the lack of enthusiasm for them.
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  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Arnold, MD
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    Carp are awesome! I grew up catching carp at Smith Mountain Lake and would regularly catch them on canned corn, popcorn, dough balls, bread crust, jellow/cornmeal balls, cheez-its, tortilla chips, bare hooks, etc. The guy next to my parents house used to feed them every day and they were abundant around our dock as a result. Over the years they grew smarter and more skeptical of anything that wasn't a pellet so using long rods we'd just hold the hook out and dap them when they came up to slurp a ball. Tons of fun on light tackle as they'd make a big first run and then head for the dock pilings and wrap you up. I caught a couple this summer with my nieces and I realized how much I missed catching them too!

    I have never really seen people targeting them here but I have seen large carp spawning in the Mattowoman and Little Hunting Creeks off the Potomac so I know some are around.
    Guy who used to fish more.


  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    columbia
    Posts
    610

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    European (Common-Cyprinus Carpio) Carp were originally introduced by Dr. Spencer F. Baird head of the US Commission of Fish and Fisheries and raised by T.B. Ferguson, Head of Maryland's Fish Commission in 1877. They were raised in a couple of small ponds in Druid Hill Park in Baltimore. Some of these were transferred to the Washington D.C. area the following year and fingerlings distributed to 24 states.

    They were also introduced in California by Julius A. Poppe five years earlier, who took matters into his own hands.

    They were introduced as a cheap food source, and were popular with the European immigrants.

    This from the americancarpsociety.com

    "Midwestern fisheries managers didn't need to hear much more than that to be convinced carp were the best thing to arrive from Europe since the brewery."

    I remember my Grandfather bringing a couple home and letting them swim in the bathtub for a day or two to clear the "mud" out.
    I also remember that they were a bloody, miserable pain in the butt to clean.
    Like CNRs a perfect fish to catch and release!

    BIG_Carp.jpg
    Yeah and you're not gonna pull that over the side of the kayak!
    The Maryland State record is 47+ pound fish caught from a pond.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Emmitsburg, MD
    Posts
    783

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post

    Another carp story -- A friend of mine, (I did not witness this) told me he caught carp on fly rod poppers during a 17 year locust hatch.
    Mark - During the last cicada hatch in Maryland (2004) I stopped in Prettyboy Reservoir and cicadas were thick everywhere at waters edge. Carp were feeding on the surface for them. I caught several carp by hooking cicadas on a smallish hook adding a weighted bobber for distance. Carp would race over and slurp them in. After catching about 3 of them the rest of the school wised-up and wouldn't hit. It was fun while it lasted.
    Howard

    16' Oldtown Camper Canoe with a side-mount 40# thrust trolling motor.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Hampstead, MD
    Posts
    731

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    Before I got my kayak, I would always fish for them in liberty reservoir with a simple trout-size hook (small) and a couple kernels of corn. Just set that out and wait, and fish for whatever else while you wait. Make sure to leave the drag fairly light because once they suck that corn down and start running, they'll easily pull an unattended rod into the water (happened to my friend Jon). The best spot I've ever seen for carp, and I will let you all in on it, is the Anacostia River not far from the community boathouse. We did a lot of work there, and we electroshocked a ton of 10-20 pound carp pretty much everywhere upriver from there, particularly along the train bridge and along the shorelines close to it. I doubt I will ever fish the anacostia, due to what I know now about it, but it's honestly loaded with fish. In a single half day shocking excursion, we got striper, snakehead, tons of sunfish species (pumpkinseed, green, etc), largemouth, blue cats, carp, etc...I think we routinely encountered 15 species per day at least. If any of you are looking to fish it, I recommend a good pair of latex gloves to be worn at all times haha

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
    Posts
    2,954

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    Quote Originally Posted by HJS View Post
    Mark - During the last cicada hatch in Maryland (2004) I stopped in Prettyboy Reservoir and cicadas were thick everywhere at waters edge. Carp were feeding on the surface for them. I caught several carp by hooking cicadas on a smallish hook adding a weighted bobber for distance. Carp would race over and slurp them in. After catching about 3 of them the rest of the school wised-up and wouldn't hit. It was fun while it lasted.
    Thanks for sharing. Looks like we'll be able to try that technique again in three years...and that may be my last opportunity to do so!
    Mark

    Slate Hobie Revolution 13
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    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
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  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Southern Maryland- Charles County
    Posts
    3,541

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    Thank goodness we don’t know our expiration date, Mark...I say we live until we die...there are no guarantees...for all we know today maybe our last day on Earth...if you have ever watched the show Doomsday Clock...so many ways for the world to end from a global pandemic, Yellowstone Super Volcano eruption, giant asteroid striking the Earth, nuclear war, global warming...you name it...but until the sand runs out of the hourglass for me, I think I’ll go fishing...
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