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Thread: How are you storing your tackle?

  1. #11
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    If you fish as well as you negotiate, I look forward to your 2018 Snaggedline reports!
    Mark

    Slate Hobie Revolution 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
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  2. #12
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    I'll chime in because I think this is the best topic on the chat-board over the winter months.

    I started out as the "bring everything" angler (and to that point, I over-pack for most things, camping, hiking, etc.)

    I've also purchased several 3600/3700/small waterproof boxes, just haven't had the time to sit down and organize everything. The Christmas / NYE holiday span should give me some quality time to organize. Like you, I had planned on dedicating a 'backpack' packed with planos specific to freshwater, and a larger backpack dedicated planos to saltwater (these may enlarge to duffel style) so that I can crab my "go-bag" having the yak already loaded the evening prior, to be on the water before dawn for that super early morning bite.

    Hopefully I'll have more detailed & photographic replies coming soon.
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  3. #13
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    What still vexes me are plastics. I know a lot of folks jam them in planos...and I don't like this. They pick up smells, dry out, stick to each other, etc, maybe it's less of an issue in the waterproof planos? I bought a big hinged plano snap case...but it was kinda pricy @$15 and doesn't hold everything AND it's too big to take in the boat. For now I've condensed identical packs into the same bags, but I've still got too many. They're living in their individual bags, sorted by type, then together in gallon size slide-lock ziplocks. At least I can pull what I want this way but I'm still taking a bag of bags with me when I roll. Do not love.

    Fwiw my plastics categories currently are: flukes/senkos and neds/frogs/creatures and grubs/various swimbait.
    2016 NuCanoe Pursuit 13.5
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  4. #14
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    Apr 2014
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    Other then Z-man plastics, I have never noticed a degradation in quality from keeping plastics in Plano boxes. I do store mine flat except for when they are in my pack or crate, but even fragile plastics like Keitech paddle tails seem to do fine in Plano boxes, so long as I don't mash them in there. I prefer the 3600 sizes as they fit well in crates and in a wider range of backpacks then the 3700 size ones. I still keep most of my plastics in the original packaging, but I feel that the protection from crushing the planos offers is well worth it for plastics that will travel around with me.
    Drew

    Yellow Pompano 12
    Lime Slayer 10

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by WVKayakFisher View Post
    What still vexes me are plastics. I know a lot of folks jam them in planos...and I don't like this. They pick up smells, dry out, stick to each other, etc, maybe it's less of an issue in the waterproof planos?...Fwiw my plastics categories currently are: flukes/senkos and neds/frogs/creatures and grubs/various swimbait.
    I haven't noticed my soft plastics degrading in my waterproof Plano boxes. But then, I don't use as many kinds of plastics that you specified. I use paddletails, Mr. Twister grubs and just a couple of other soft plastic forms that are slightly longer and thinner than paddletails. Most are white or yellow but I also carry darker colors. The biggest issue I have with them is that they'll bleed colors onto each other if they are not compartmentalized in the Plano boxes. That's actually not a bad problem. Some days a traditional color doesn't matter and the fish happen to like the unique color that I accidentally made with careless storage.

    As you implied, I believe the packages they come in preserve their moisture content and their longevity so I keep my soft plastics in those bags until I take them on the water in my Plano boxes. I replenish them in the box as I need them during the season. But once they leave the storage bag, they rarely go back and they seem to retain their pliability well enough for the time they reside in the box.

    I don't take many plastics with me on the water and I don't use many plastics on an outing unless bluefish are present -- see here:

    P1010784.jpg

    I'm sure that's a familiar sight to many of us. Did you ever wonder how they know where the hook is? They always seem to bite the plastic just behind the hook.

    When blues are not around, It's not unusual to catch a lot of fish on a single soft plastic. That in itself can become a game within a game on the water. How many fish can I catch on one soft plastic?

    So again, I think it gets down to a realistic assessment of what you'll need on the water. For most of my outings I could probably get by with 2 or 3 paddletails. I take maybe 10 times that many because I can fit them easily into a single box. I do not carry multiple storage bags of soft plastics with me.
    Mark

    Slate Hobie Revolution 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  6. #16
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    I believe in keeping things simple and uncluttered in the kayak. I acknowledge that I do not change lures often. I frequently keep throwing or trolling the same soft plastics until they are worn out.

    On every trip I use a Plano waterproof 3741 tray (14" x 9" x 2-7/8"). Inside that box I have a smaller Plano tray used to hold jigheads from 1/16-oz to 3/4-oz. There is enough extra space for my fishing license (in a plastic bag), some bandaids, a Leatherman tool, a few small spinnerbaits, and a dozen or so loose 3" or 4" paddletails. For most trips that is all I need for 2-4 hours of fishing.

    002.jpg

    If I am using Gulp baits (which I buy in tubs rather than in bags) I place the desired number of Gulps in a small Plano Liqua-Bait locker bottle.

    003a.jpg



    I may also grab a handful of other soft plastic tails and either lay them in the cup holder of the kayak, place them in a pocket of my PFD, or drop them in a small plastic tub. These few tackle containers can easily sit under or behind my seat. I carry a Fish Grips and a pair of pliers -- that is the extent of what I need.

    Mark mentioned bleeding of colors when loose lures are stored together. I use predominantly 12 Fathom brand soft plastics. I get them in bulk. A few of their colors (dark red in particular) tend to bleed, but most colors do not. I can leave them in my PFD pocket or a cup for several weeks at a time and not find much bleeding.

    Many Snaggedline members are big fans of Z-Man plastics. I like them too, but not as well as my 12 Fathom plastics. The only time I use Z-Man tails is when bluefish are prevalent. Whereas I can comfortably toss a bunch of 12 Fathom or other brand tails loose in the tackle tray, I cannot mix Z-man plastics with other plastics. Years ago I made that mistake and found a ball of sticky plastics when all the tails melted and fused. If I decide to carry Z-Man tails on a trip, I place a sealed pouch inside the Plano tray.

    That setup covers nearly all of my local saltwater trips. When fishing in lakes and ponds, I often carry a small tray with a few jigheads and 2"-3" twister tails. I rarely fish crankbaits or poppers from my kayak.

    The only time in recent memory that I ran out of lures was last May when Harlan and I fished for large bluefish at Ocean City. I had several dozen paddletails and swim shads with me. We each caught over 20 blues from 22" to 28". They destroyed every soft plastic tail I had with me. By then we were so tired we did not mind stopping.

    Being able to leave the launch with a small amount of gear takes some practice and mental preparation. Many anglers feel more comfortable having lots of tackle with them.
    John Veil
    Annapolis
    Native Watercraft Manta Ray 11 and Slayer Propel 10
    Member - Pro Staff team for Native Watercraft

    Author - "Fishing in the Comfort Zone" - light tackle fishing techniques for kayaks and small boats

  7. #17
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    Feb 2011
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    Southern Maryland- Charles County
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    I usually rig four rods with the lures I plan to use for the day and carry a dozen or so Sea Shad Bass Assassin soft plastic replacement tails...one rod has an XR10 (or up to an XR14, depending on the season) XRap, one rod has a pearl/chart jighead Bass Assassin swim bait, one rod has a chartreuse glow jighead bass assassin swimbait on it, and during white perch season I have a mini crankbait on my lightest outfit...otherwise it has a top water popper on it...I try not to replace lures on the water...I replace outfits...put one up and grab another...all the knots are carefully tied back on dry land...this system works for me...
    "Lady Luck" 2016 Red Hibiscus Outback
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  8. #18
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    Apr 2014
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    It is always amazing to me the difference between inshore and freshwater bass guys when it comes to how much tackle they feel like they "need" to have with them. And then there are the tenkara guys, some of which fish a single style of fly no matter what the condition.
    Drew

    Yellow Pompano 12
    Lime Slayer 10

  9. #19
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    Sep 2015
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    Burke, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.A. Veil View Post
    I believe in keeping things simple and uncluttered in the kayak. I acknowledge that I do not change lures often. I frequently keep throwing or trolling the same soft plastics until they are worn out.

    Many Snaggedline members are big fans of Z-Man plastics.
    John,

    I'm one of those guys that's a huge fan of Z-Man baits. I predominantly like them because, like you, I'm an angler that wants to minimize the amount of tackle I bring with me and I would rather be fishing than replacing lures on the water.

    Here are my own personal PROS and CONS when it comes to Z-Mans. I'm sure there are other qualities to add to this list, but I share these observations for the benefit of others on the fence about Z-Mans.

    PROS:
    1. They are incredibly resilient. I have used a single Z-Man paddle tail cast after cast during wild bluefish blitzes. Because of the special ElaZtech material used by Z-Man, I was afforded double-digit catch numbers on the same paddle tail. With other plastic tails I would have spent precious time looking for and replacing half-eaten tails. Because of the Z-Man resiliency, I don't have to carry hard-plastic lures with me just in case I run into toothy fish. In the end I'm saving space and reducing the clutter.

    2. My preferred Z-Man striper bait is the DiezelMinnowZ. It comes as a 4-inch paddletail with a hook slot embedded inside the dorsal fin of the bait. The hook slot provides the angler a dummy-proof way to ensure the hook is mounted directly on-centerline of the bait thereby maximizing the swimming motion and eliminating any unnatural presentation a slightly off-centered hook can create.

    3. The DiezelMinnowZ comes in a large choice of colors - and variations of colors - to accommodate every angler's taste.

    4. One 5-pack of DiezelMinnowZ tails could last you half the season, saving you money and time in the long run.

    5. Once on the jig head, or on the bait-holder-style worm hook, the Z-Man tail stays on. Cast after cast, day after day, month after month the same tail does not slide off the jig head (and no, I don't use Super Glue)

    CONS:
    1. Price. A 5-pack of DieselMinnowZ tails costs about $5.

    2. The ElaZtech plastic is hard to get on the jig head or on "bait-holder-style" worm hooks.
    *If you have tried Z-Mans and are frustrated by this characteristic, there are a couple of videos on YouTube that help immensely. In retrospect, once the ElaZtech material is wrapped around the jig head's bait keeper barbs or the bait-holder wire, it is not coming off.

    3. For some reason the ElaZtech material does not like mixed company. Z-Mans should be kept in their original packaging lest you run the risk of finding a molten, plastic blob when you are ready to use them.

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by baitball; 12-31-2017 at 11:11 AM.
    -manny

    Hobie Outback
    Wilderness Systems 130T

  10. #20
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    [QUOTE=bunnielab;150986]It is always amazing to me the difference between inshore and freshwater bass guys when it comes to how much tackle they feel like they "need" to have with them. And then there are the tenkara guys, some of which fish a single style of fly no matter what the condition.[/QUOTE

    I think we can get away with fewer lures more often than we realize.

    I've never felt that with freshwater bass it's a "match the hatch" situation. And to a certain degree, I feel the same way with tidal fishing. Although there are days when stripers clearly prefer a certain size and a specific color of a lure. But often (I think anyway) those fish are so predatory that they react to movement, vibration and maybe even smell, although I do not use scented baits.

    So, for me, lure selection comes down to what I have confidence in using. I've learned to fish a few lures and flies reasonably well and that has worked for me.

    The major question I face is top water or no. That's answered by the time of year and time of day or in tidal water, seeing an obvious blitz underway. Otherwise, it's hard for me to tie on anything other than a jig and soft plastic, a jig spinner, a wooly bugger or a Clouser Minnow.
    Mark

    Slate Hobie Revolution 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

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