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Thread: Starter fly combo (cheap start up)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Westminster, MD
    Posts
    148

    Default Starter fly combo (cheap start up)

    As I watch videos over the internet and the latest rods and reels from company's like Sage, Lamson, Ross reels, etc. fly fishing gets a wrap of being a expensive pursuit. Wile yes it will tend to cost more upfront then a thirty dollar Walmart spinning combo, fly fishing is still a option for someone that is a little tight on a budget. If anyone is interested in fly fishing but is worried about cost, let me help you with these lower cost options. I also encourage other users to update and add to this list to help encourage more people to give fly fishing a shot!


    Eagle claw makes a great start up rod for around 20-35 bucks the first photo is the eagle claw featherlight and is the rod I started with. It's harder to find now and most likely will have to order but can be found. The second rod is the eagle claw black eagle and is a exclusive to walmart. I find the black eagle didn't cast as well but at 20 bucks I keep one in the car as a back up. I believe they run from a 3/4wt to a 5/6wt and the black eagle is a 5wt only. Cheap reels can be found online anywhere. In my opinion in the 5wt and under class of rods the reels more or less just hold your line...unless you are targeting carp a cheap reel will do the job to start.


    This combo will cost more but you can target larger fish (carp, bass, stripers, etc) The rod is a Wright and McGill flats blue fly rod 7wt. Retail price is 150 but if you watch for deals you can get rods like this super cheap. I picked this one up brand new on eBay for 32.99 SHIPPED! The listing has now jumped to over 70 but that is still a great deal. As for the reel it is a older sage 1680 I got for around a hundred dollars a few years ago. A decent price point reel will be around that price. No they won't be the lightest reels, but they are pretty good. Most major company's have reels in that price range.

    I know a lot of people freak out when you say fly line can cost 80-100 bucks. But not all do cost that much some can be had for as little as 40 and will cast well enough to get you started. For a lower price option you can also check out...
    http://discountfishingdenver.com/t/fly-line
    You can pick up fly line for as little was ten dollars. I've ordered from them before and have had a much better experience with there "factory over run" fly line, then ordering from some Chinese eBay fly line.

    I know this is a lot of info but I hope this helps someone take the plunge into fly fishing. After a frustrating start into it with all the wrong gear I hope to help guide fellow fishermen on other alternatives that worked well for me. The kayak is a great platform to start on. I can't tell you how many trees I snagged on a backcast bank fishing. Any questions let me know. Or if you simply want to try it out, reach out and we can work something out. Tight lines!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Desert Camo- Moken 14
    Tan- Tarpon 140

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Midway between Baltimore and Washington
    Posts
    1,703

    Default

    I want to get one of those Eagle Claw Featherlight 3 weight rods.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
    Posts
    2,592

    Default

    FishMoken,

    Thank you for your post.

    I agree with you that it can be daunting for newcomers to the sport to look at catalogs and websites touting fly fishing gear from Sage, Loomis, Orvis, etc. Their offerings are indeed pricey. They also are top quality rods, lightweight, built to last and most come with no-questions-asked lifetime warrantees. If you bust one by slamming a car door on it, they will replace it. In fact, some companies will overnight mail a replacement to you if you are on a trip.

    On the other hand, I have commented on this forum before that I have seen a tremendous increase in quality from lower priced rod offerings in recent years.

    My favorite rod is a 6 wt. high end St. Croix Legend Series that I bought in the early 1990s at a cost that was a non-trivial expense to me at that time given my family obligations. That rod functions as well today as it did when it was new. It is top quality gear and has proven itself to me for over 25 years.

    However, I have also purchased less expensive gear in those years that has served me well. I recently used a relatively new $125 TFO 4 wt. to catch trout in western MD. I have used the same rod to catch perch in the Severn and bluegills in ponds. It's a fine rod and casts like a dream. Will it last, 25 years like my St. Croix? Unfortunately, I won't so it doesn't matter to me! But it's a fine rod and I have caught many fish on it.

    Generally speaking, the quality distinction in fly rods comes from the guides, reel mount and handle. Yes, the graphite itself is important. But what the makers attach to the graphite is more critical for longevity and performance and price.

    Lines are also very important and you get what you pay for as you noted. A quality line can turn an average caster into a very good one. It can enhance the performance of any rod. However, if you are targeting pond bluegills or even stocked trout in a small stream you don't need to cast far. And frankly, if you are fly fishing in a kayak you do not need to make long casts. An inexpensive line will do in many applications.

    I believe the thing about fly fishing that deters many from trying is its perceived difficulty and complexity. Some of that is enhanced or even encouraged by fly fishing jargon: rod weights, leaders, tippets, 4x, 5x, WF, sinking and intermediate line, etc. It can be confusing.

    In reality it is a very simple way to fish, almost as easy as flipping a string tied on the end of a cane pole into a pond. It's not much different actually. The reel, as you stated, is mainly a line holder in most fly fishing applications. The rest of the process is done manually. And that's what I like about it -- to actually feel the pull of the fish I have caught via the line I am holding in my hand. It's a different sensation than "reeling one in."

    So yes, the hobby is not as expensive as many may think. Nor, I would add, is it as difficult as some may like you to believe. It does not need to be exclusive, expensive or hard to do. It's also a great fun.

    Thanks again for your post. I hope it makes some conversions.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Burke, VA
    Posts
    205

    Default

    FishMoken,

    Thanks for the info and for taking the time to post.
    I'm one of those individuals that is ready to try fly-fishing but have yet to take the plunge.
    Your's and Mark's thoughts are encouraging for us gun-shy anglers.
    I recently bought a small, practice, "yarn rod" to work with and get my timing and tempo down. One of these days I'll commit and pick up an outfit like you suggest.
    I appreciate all the tips.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    -manny

    Hobie Outback
    Wilderness System 130T

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
    Posts
    2,592

    Default

    Manny,

    If you, or anyone on Snaggedline, want casting tips or lessons, I'll be glad to provide them in person. PM me.

    Once you get the hang of it -- and it will not take long -- you'll be casting and not even thinking about the process of casting. Then you can concentrate on catching fish. And that's no different than using conventional tackle in terms of where you target your casts.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

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