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Thread: Conversion

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Pasadena, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanMarino View Post
    I've never had a cow nose ray on the end of my line. Do these things accidentally get snagged while you boys troll around? What do those suckers naturally eat?
    Tom,

    I think we snag most of them while trolling. Only once did I catch one casting. I saw fins break the surface near a bank in the southern Bay and in my exuberance, I thought it was a redfish tailing. I laid a perfect cast in front of the fins and hooked the devil.

    The one I caught yesterday while trolling in the Severn fooled me briefly. A telltale sign of a CNR is a steady heavy pull without the headshake of a striper. I honestly thought I felt a headshake yesterday shortly after hookup. But then the line started to strip from my reel in that steady CNR pull.

    I rid myself of CNRs as fast I can by pointing my rod at them and holding the spool to encourage the leader to snap.

    Yesterday, that process cost me an X-Rap.
    Mark

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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Hampstead, MD
    Posts
    669

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    Yeah the only one I've hooked is while trolling paddletails out of Jonas green. Went past a marker buoy and WHAM drag starts screaming.....I was excited about the possibility of a red drum, cobia, big rockfish, etc., but realized after about 2 minutes of the fight, that it was probably a ray. Got it up to the boat about 5minutes later, and confirmed this, and I could see the lure stuck in its wing. However, after multiple attempts of trying to get it close enough to de-hook, I had to just cut the leader really close to the lure, since it just kept soaking me over and over, and wasn't tiring. I have a lot of respect for them, they're ridiculously strong. They get a bad rap because watermen and recreational guys like to scapegoat them for eating all the oysters, crabs, or whatever seems scarce, but it turns out, after numerous studies (as is usually the case), they're a very natural presence and humans are yet again the reason for the decline of the crabs, oysters, etc. It's a shame because you see a lot of jagoffs spearing them or just needlessly killing them, thinking they're making a difference or something. Same thing with skate, and like I said in a previous thread, the days of me just walking by and not asking questions to the fisherman with 10 dead skates in front of him are long gone, now I don't mind the confrontation. Can't stand just killing skates, dogfish, and rays, because a fisherman just keeps catching them! What a terrible problem, right?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
    Posts
    2,852

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    I'm intrigued by their lengthy migration. They come to the Chesapeake from the coast of Florida.

    Their presence here is a natural part of their reproductive cycle. They're not invasive.

    I feel bad when I snag one because I really don't want to hurt them.

    I will actually pull my line(s) from the water if I see a school of them.
    Mark

    Slate Hobie Revolution 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    columbia
    Posts
    600

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    The Maryland DNR did prohibit the mass killing tournaments.
    They were pretty brutal, as shown on TV last year.

    It is very hard to change people's mentality about them since they have such a bad reputation.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Baltimore-Annapolis
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    383

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    i've also had them pickup raw shrimp on a double drop rig when i'm bottom fishing for catfish, and i've also hit while trolling.
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  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    columbia
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    I also use 10 pound test braid-sufix neon, that one of those tackle testing sites actually measured at an 18 pound breaking strength.
    I don't recall what the 20 pound would break at.
    I use a 15 pound test leader, and when forced to break off, either the leader, or very occasionally, the knot breaks before the main line.

    You're darn right about pointing the rod at the Ray to break off. I had two of them try to do the "manhole cover on the bottom" act near Fort McHenry several years ago (tin boat days) and in lifting them up had two rods explode. We've had them break Ugly Sticks on the Charter boat and that takes some doing!

    I'd worry about trying to lift them broad side from a canoe or kayak.
    That enormous carp I caught this past spring gave me all I could handle to get it along side, no way I was going to try to lift it over the side for a photo.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Middletown, DE
    Posts
    186

    Default Conversion

    We catch them regularly fishing for sharks in the DE bay. They deffinately bite as all the ones we catch are hooked in the mouth.
    Last edited by willf650; 07-14-2017 at 03:49 PM.
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  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Davidsonville, MD
    Posts
    690

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    Quote Originally Posted by yakscientist View Post
    Yeah the only one I've hooked is while trolling paddletails out of Jonas green. Went past a marker buoy and WHAM drag starts screaming.....I was excited about the possibility of a red drum, cobia, big rockfish, etc., but realized after about 2 minutes of the fight, that it was probably a ray. Got it up to the boat about 5minutes later, and confirmed this, and I could see the lure stuck in its wing. However, after multiple attempts of trying to get it close enough to de-hook, I had to just cut the leader really close to the lure, since it just kept soaking me over and over, and wasn't tiring. I have a lot of respect for them, they're ridiculously strong. They get a bad rap because watermen and recreational guys like to scapegoat them for eating all the oysters, crabs, or whatever seems scarce, but it turns out, after numerous studies (as is usually the case), they're a very natural presence and humans are yet again the reason for the decline of the crabs, oysters, etc. It's a shame because you see a lot of jagoffs spearing them or just needlessly killing them, thinking they're making a difference or something. Same thing with skate, and like I said in a previous thread, the days of me just walking by and not asking questions to the fisherman with 10 dead skates in front of him are long gone, now I don't mind the confrontation. Can't stand just killing skates, dogfish, and rays, because a fisherman just keeps catching them! What a terrible problem, right?
    Skates are much different than rays. Skate meat is nice and white and very tender when cooked correctly. I love skate meat.
    John


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