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Thread: A Question, If You Please

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Annapolis, MD.
    Posts
    493

    Default A Question, If You Please

    A quick question. Does anyone put any kind of lubricant on you kayak bottom to help with its movement through the water?
    John
    Annapolis
    Native Slayer Propel 10, Native Ultimate 12

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Westminster, MD
    Posts
    172

    Default

    I use to wax my kayaks one time each year to help smooth the bottom but no longer do. After reading an article about performance gains for kayakers who wax there kayaks it is more or less a waste of time. The study said you are only gaining nano seconds when racing kayaks. No extra glide or performance was really gained by doing it so I just stopped. Plus I figured it was just one more chemical entering the waterways so there is that aspect as well.


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    Desert Camo- Moken 14
    Tan- Tarpon 140

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    columbia
    Posts
    600

    Default

    When my canoe was new, I used to rub in some Armorall as a UV surface protectant to the outside of the hull. My hull was ABS (Royalex) with a color coat, not solid plastic like most yaks.
    My canoe was outside and exposed to sunlight all day. It eventually faded to the point where it didn't matter any longer.

    I don't think that it made a huge difference in water resistance, but it did cut down on weeds and crud sticking to the hull.
    Great point about putting chemicals into the water.........

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
    Posts
    2,852

    Default

    Kind of a bit off topic but I've wondered if the normal scratches that accumulate on bottoms of our yaks increase water resistance. I imagine they do but perhaps imperceptibly to us.

    Regarding applying a coating, I've been tempted by a bottle of Turtle Wax in my garage to try it on the hulls of my boats. I thought someone might mention car wax in this thread. Since they haven't indicated wax is beneficial I should probably keep it for use on my van.
    Mark

    Slate Hobie Revolution 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Burke, VA
    Posts
    285

    Default

    Interesting topic. I hadn't really given it much thought, but now that the question is out there, I would volunteer surfboard wax as a possible alternative.

    Having surfed a bit when a lived in California and Florida, I've used a lot of surfboard wax and tried many different brands.

    Surfboard wax is some pretty resilient stuff, it's purposely made to stand up to the elements. Unlike car wax that intends to leave a slick film, surfboard wax's tacky composition is used to improve the surfer's traction on the surface of the board -- it helps the surfer's feet "grip" the board.

    The wax adheres well to the surfboard - made out of fiberglass - and stands up to the constant beating of a surfer's feet/weight, wetsuit (he lays down on the board to paddle), sun exposure, and saltwater. However, the wax is impermeable to water and as such would not increase water resistance.

    Perhaps a stick of surfboard wax could fill in those underbelly scratches/gouges Mark is referring to? This approach is certainly cheaper and less time consuming than braking out the plastic stock and welder to fill in those unsightly blemishes.

    NOTE: Surfboard wax comes in two types, "Cold Water" and "Warm Water" wax.
    -manny

    Hobie Outback
    Wilderness Systems 130T

  6. #6

    Default

    I used a specialty wax that a friend gave me to try. I will try to contact him for the name of the product. Anyway what I found is dirt, grim, etc did not adhear to the kayak and it was easy to spray off without scrubbing. You only put a really fine layer and it lasted quite a while. As far as going faster I think it made no real difference but cleaning it was much easier.
    Last edited by On the fly; 07-05-2017 at 07:12 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Annapolis, MD.
    Posts
    493

    Default

    Thanks for that note
    John
    Annapolis
    Native Slayer Propel 10, Native Ultimate 12

  8. #8

    Default

    The name of the product is eelsnot. Link: http://eelsnot.com/. I think the sample was for boats but there is a board version. (I think it is only a smaller size). Anyway it seems to perform as advertised. I still have a little left I will get it to you John so you can try the product.
    Harry
    Last edited by On the fly; 07-05-2017 at 07:29 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Burke, VA
    Posts
    285

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by On the fly View Post
    The name of the product is eelsnot. Link: http://eelsnot.com/. I think the sample was for boats but there is a board version. (I think it is only a smaller size). Anyway it seems to perform as advertised. I still have a little left I will get to you John so you can try the product.
    Harry
    Harry,

    I checked out the eelsnot website and it looks like some pretty neat stuff. When you tried it on your yak, how long did it last?
    -manny

    Hobie Outback
    Wilderness Systems 130T

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    3,867

    Default

    There are various products that are designed for making exterior surfaces very smooth so that rain or other items do not stick easily. Before applying those products to the plastic hull of your kayak, read the fine print to make sure the product is compatible with plastic materials. For example, I had a bottle of Rain-X windshield treatment that makes glass surfaces very slick. I planned to apply it to the Lexan windshield on my center console. Fortunately, I read the instructions carefully and found that standard Rain-X should not be applied to plastic surfaces. Now Rain-X makes other plastic-friendly products too. I cannot recommend any specific product to improve the slickness of your hull. As others have suggested, I suspect that modifying the slickness of the hull would only incrementally change your speed.
    John Veil
    Annapolis
    Native Watercraft Manta Ray 11 and Slayer Propel 10
    Member - Pro Staff team for Native Watercraft

    Author - "Fishing in the Comfort Zone" - light tackle fishing techniques for kayaks and small boats

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