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Thread: Kayak fishing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Southern Maryland- Charles County
    Posts
    3,338

    Cool Kayak fishing

    My last trip out on a big powerboat trolling for striped bass was a real eye-opener for me- planer boards with two lures on every line...4/0 Penn Senators reels on 6' solid fiberglass heavy boat rods loaded with 50# monofilament...I felt sorry for the 36 inch striped bass being winched in...

    But kayak fishing is different...it is perfect for light tackle fishing...in fact using heavy tackle is a hindrance and severely handicaps you...lures are different.... lighter, smaller more castable, in most cases...much more sporting, more reliant on your skills as an angler...first and foremost- all the choices are yours and yours alone-the make and model of your kayak, your location, your launch, your tackle, your bait, the targeted species you will fish for...you may ask advice, seek instruction...but ultimately it is all up to you...the art of self-reliance in play...
    "Lady Luck" 2016 Red Hibiscus Outback
    "Ugly Duckling" 2010 Olive Hobie Outback
    "Wet Dream" 2011 yellow Ocean Prowler 13

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    103

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    This may sound arrogant, but I will add that I believe that to be successful kayak fishermen you have to focus on your craft a whole lot more than power boaters. Last Saturday my brother in law and I both limited out in about 30 minutes of rockfish fishing. A power boater in the area who had 8 rods set up on various holders around his boat asked me what I was using. He said that he'd been there for an hour and had used every set up on his boat and was skunked. I may be slow, but I have my fair share of success.

    Plus, the small person in me gets a kick out of being alone in my kayak in the middle of the bay when charter boats show up with a half dozen clients shoulder to shoulder dropping their lines in 50 yards away. I wonder what they think of me. For me there is nothing like the intimacy between me and the water and the fish when I'm in my kayak. I don't begrudge anyone else for what they do and am happy to see others happy and successful. I just know what works best for me, for fishing, relaxing, exercising, stress relief, etc.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Southern Maryland- Charles County
    Posts
    3,338

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    Big Mike pointed this out to me last week...a charterboat with six or more customers powered past us on their way out...Mike said...there goes $600.00 to catch less than what we caught...
    "Lady Luck" 2016 Red Hibiscus Outback
    "Ugly Duckling" 2010 Olive Hobie Outback
    "Wet Dream" 2011 yellow Ocean Prowler 13

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Laytonsville, Md
    Posts
    299

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    There is almost a pre-disposition in power-boaters to think that us kayaker's are the best fisherman. Once, last year, a power-boater and I came in at the same time. He came running over to compare our catch. He seemed truly shocked that I had been skunked.

    Best Regards,
    Stan
    Wilderness Systems Ride 135

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    East of Frederick
    Posts
    73

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    Nothing more gratifying than catching a fish on a yak. You are your own motor. You rely on yourself to survive and to have fun. Something about a deck hand handing me a huge rod with a fish on the end of it and telling me to pull in. He then gaffes the fish and throws it in an ice bucket. Does not seem like real fishing! Boring.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
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    2,615

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    I will not presume to say that I’m a better angler because I fish from a kayak. But I will say that my experience wading rivers with a fly rod has improved my kayak angling skills. I think the reason is that both forms of fishing place me close to the water, as close as I can get staying right-side up! I’ve learned to read the water from a vantage point that’s more intimate than being in a boat. Also, both are very tactile ways to fish. I feel the power of the water’s current wading or kayaking. I certainly get wet in both kinds of fishing. I feel the strength of the fish pulling my kayak. In the case of fly fishing I’m directly connected to the fish with my left hand on one end of the line and the fish on the other. There are no gear ratios in between. Certainly, an angler who trolls with heavy tackle in a motor boat cannot appreciate any of the above sensations.

    There are many ways to fish; many ways to catch the same species of fish. Even among kayakers we see tremendous variation. Some rely heavily on rigging and accessories to improve their odds. Others are minimalists who regard simplicity as their biggest asset. We see those who pedal and those who paddle. We see trollers and casters; those who use conventional tackle and those who fly fish. Bait anglers vs. those who use artificials. Some search only for big fish. Others are happy to catch whatever they can when they can. They may even go fishing when they do not expect to catch anything, simply to enjoy the very act of fishing. I do. How crazy is that? Our variations as kayakers may be as odd to other anglers as boaters with broomstick rods seem to us.

    So, I kayak fish because I like to fish. I hope I never measure my enjoyment as a kayak angler solely by what I catch, how many and how big. If it comes to that, I'll find another hobby.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Perry Hall, MD
    Posts
    2,064

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    We have to be more thorough anglers because we can't run from place to place to try and find hungry schools. We fish where we are and learn to catch smaller schools and single fish. The techniques end up being very different for the same fishery. It's pretty cool. We use the tools available to us and that changes the way we fish.

    Good job guys, keep showing off our sport!
    ______________________________________________

    Light Tackle Kayak Trolling the Chesapeake Bay, Author
    Kokatat Pro Staff
    Torqeedo Pro Staff
    Humminbird Pro Staff

    2011 Ivory Dune Outback
    Perry Hall, MD
    Alan

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Silver Spring
    Posts
    603

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    Nice thread! I have a friend with a 25' Parker, a nice fishing boat capable of going offshore off OC or wherever. We get out 2-3 times a season in the
    Bay, and have been doing this for several seasons. We have a lot of fun, but I've yet to catch a keeper rockfish with him. We usually end up chasing birds, and the requisite dinks, or dropping peelers or bloodworms and bottom fishing; again, catching perch which is fine, but no larger fish.

    One thing I've realized from fishing with him is just the sheer amount of water in the Bay. This itself is very intimidating if you want to find keeper stripers. There are simply an unlimited # of choices with a sea worthy craft, and 250 horses with plenty of gas pushing it. What to do, where to go, what techniques to use, and on and on!

    Kayak fishing narrows the # of choices within any given launch locale. So, we study in advance; tides, solunar tables, weather,charts for bottom features like drop offs and /or points, hard sandy bottoms, oyster beds, water temps, and lures to match the prey that is there. This requires more knowledge, preparation, and skill to present the right lure, at the right time where fish are most likely to be. The ability to get into the shallows, and/or tight spots is our advantage in a kayak; IF we do our homework!
    Last edited by Fishinfool; 06-22-2017 at 01:44 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    3,771

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    I am a huge proponent of kayak fishing, in part for its simplicity and ease of logistics. But I also own a 16' Scout center console that allows me to have a greater range for the light tackle casting I enjoy. For example, this morning EMSer, John Rentch, and I launched my boat in an Eastern Shore river where I have not fished in several years. We targeted shallow water habitats and used the trolling motor to move us stealthily along grassy edges, sod banks, and stump fields. Collectively we caught about 75 stripers (to 21") and 4 specs (to 20"). I don't know about Bruce, but neither John nor I could have covered the 20 miles we did today in our kayaks. I did a similar trip in Eastern Bay yesterday with Mark -- we caught close to 40 stripers in similar shallow habitats, but covered over 30 miles.

    While using my small center console, I fish in ways similar to how I fish in my kayak -- but I can get to more places in a single trip. I mention this because much of this thread sounds negative about boat fishing. I love fishing from a kayak or from a boat. The differences ares where I can go and how long I have to fish. Of course the cost of licensing, operating, storing, and towing a power boat is considerably higher than the cost of a kayak. I feel fortunate that I have both options to choose from.
    John Veil
    Annapolis
    Native Watercraft Manta Ray 11 and Slayer Propel 10
    Member - Pro Staff team for Native Watercraft

    Author - "Fishing in the Comfort Zone" - light tackle fishing techniques for kayaks and small boats

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.A. Veil View Post
    ...I don't know about Bruce, but neither John nor I could have covered the 20 miles we did today in our kayaks. I did a similar trip in Eastern Bay yesterday with Mark -- we caught close to 40 stripers in similar shallow habitats, but covered over 30 miles.
    I certainly could have covered your 20 miles today in my kayak -- with a rope tied to the stern of the Scout.

    Congrats to you and Bruce and John on another great "Scouting" trip.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

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