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Thread: Screws and Nuts

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    181

    Default Screws and Nuts

    Simple question from a noob: what size machine screw do you guys use? Is there a standard size or should I look at getting a variety? Also, when you screw, what type of nut is the best? When I screw I want to use the right nut. I think there is a joke in there somewhere...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Pasadena, MD
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    I use lots of size 8-10 stainless screws/botls and if it's on something I wish to be permanent spring for locking nuts that have the nylon inserts.
    2015 Hobie Outback
    2001 Dagger Cayman

    John

  3. #3

    Default

    I use well nuts, pretty easy to install and a great seal.

    Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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    Aug 2015
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    Manassas
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    Default

    I think #10 SS bolts/nuts tend to be a standard size. Tractor Supply Company sells packages of them for a couple bucks each--tends to be a bit cheaper than Home Depot or Lowes.

    If you size the bolt correctly and get the right length, a locknut works well. Remember to use a washer--you're almost always better off.
    2014 Hobie Pro Angler 12
    I need a good paddling

  5. #5
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    Mar 2016
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    Havre de grace, MD
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Huntrava View Post
    I think #10 SS bolts/nuts tend to be a standard size. Tractor Supply Company sells packages of them for a couple bucks each--tends to be a bit cheaper than Home Depot or Lowes.

    If you size the bolt correctly and get the right length, a locknut works well. Remember to use a washer--you're almost always better off.
    Home Depot the small quantity packages of SS nut and bolts are $1.18ea. I know I work there in the hardware dept...lol The prices at West Marine are higher because the carry 316 Marine grade SS there is a difference it is more resistant to corrosion.
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  6. #6
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    Default

    Perhaps most of you know this but I didn't...

    Stainless steel will not adhere to a magnet. I learned the hard way. I once spilled a large container of small stainless steel nuts, washers and screws on my lawn. I thought, no problem, I'll "sweep" them up with a strong magnet. It didn't work.

    So if you come across an unidentified screw and want to know if it is stainless before you use it on your kayak, you can test it with a magnet.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  7. #7
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    Jun 2011
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    Perhaps most of you know this but I didn't...

    Stainless steel will not adhere to a magnet. I learned the hard way. I once spilled a large container of small stainless steel nuts, washers and screws on my lawn. I thought, no problem, I'll "sweep" them up with a strong magnet. It didn't work.

    So if you come across an unidentified screw and want to know if it is stainless before you use it on your kayak, you can test it with a magnet.

    As Oldbayrunner suggests, not all stainless steel has the same corrosion resistance or resistance to magnetic attraction. After reading Mark's comment, I went to my basement and dumped out onto my workbench a container holding miscellaneous stainless nuts, bolts, screws, and washers I have bought over the years. I placed a strong magnet over the pile and found that 10%-20% of the hardware was attracted to the magnet. Visually, those items looked identical in appearance to the ones not attracted to the magnet.

    In a second test, I went into my kitchen and held a refrigerator magnet against four "stainless" appliances. The magnet stuck to the Kitchenaid refrigerator and dishwasher, but did not stick to the GE stove and microwave.

    Mark's magnetic test is a good first step (if the hardware does not stick to a magnet, it is stainless or some other non-ferrous metal). However, some hardware sold as stainless will stick to a magnet. It may still offer reasonable protection from rusting compared to regular steel hardware.
    John Veil
    Annapolis
    Native Watercraft Manta Ray 11 and Slayer Propel 10
    Member - Pro Staff team for Native Watercraft

    Author - "Fishing in the Comfort Zone" - light tackle fishing techniques for kayaks and small boats

  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J.A. Veil View Post
    As Oldbayrunner suggests, not all stainless steel has the same corrosion resistance or resistance to magnetic attraction. After reading Mark's comment, I went to my basement and dumped out onto my workbench a container holding miscellaneous stainless nuts, bolts, screws, and washers I have bought over the years. I placed a strong magnet over the pile and found that 10%-20% of the hardware was attracted to the magnet. Visually, those items looked identical in appearance to the ones not attracted to the magnet.

    In a second test, I went into my kitchen and held a refrigerator magnet against four "stainless" appliances. The magnet stuck to the Kitchenaid refrigerator and dishwasher, but did not stick to the GE stove and microwave.

    Mark's magnetic test is a good first step (if the hardware does not stick to a magnet, it is stainless or some other non-ferrous metal). However, some hardware sold as stainless will stick to a magnet. It may still offer reasonable protection from rusting compared to regular steel hardware.
    Here is a case in point:

    P1020593.jpg P1020594.jpg

    These are Native brand paddle holders. They're mounted in the gear track on my starboard gunnel of my Ultimate 12. I use them to hold my paddle when I fly fish in lieu of resting the paddle in my lap as I do when I use conventional tackle. As you can see, there is a little rust on the screws. However, they are not attracted to my magnet. They must be stainless to some degree. Fortunately, none of the factory installed screws on my Native kayak itself show any rust. The same goes for my Hobie.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Southern Maryland- Charles County
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    400 series stainless steel is magnetic and some can be heat treated 410, 416, 422, 17-4-PH...and it will slightly rust with a very light surface rust- it is extremely strong...300 series will not rust...and is not magnetic...high nickel content- 302, 304, 306 stainless are the most common
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  10. #10
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    Mar 2015
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    Ocean City MD
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    Default

    As an alternative, I've used the plastic trigrip rivets with success with a touch of goop. These are for padeyes where I may clamp pliers, or even attach a rodleash. I'm told they can hold more permanent things, but have not tried them with anything that is likely to put a great deal or torque on the pedeye.
    Red 2015 Hobie Outback
    Olive 2015 PA 14

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