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Thread: Question about the salt

  1. #1
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    Mar 2014
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    Post Question about the salt

    I've fished all my life...mostly cat (and relatively new to kayaks), but I really want to learn the salt side of fishing. What are the best methods? I know I can scour the web and youtube, but I also know there's nothing like "doing". I want to get out at some meet and greets this year, and I figured that's one of the best ways. However, before I launch, what about my tackle...rods/reel? What are some newb things I should know about that before I hit the water to better prepare me for actually catching something? :-)
    Anthony

    Redfish 12 Angler

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    458

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    Here ya go! Besides my father this is what got me started surf fishing and sharking.
    http://www.tx-sharkfishing.com/surf-fishing/



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    Zack
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  3. #3
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    Mar 2014
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    Thanks!
    Anthony

    Redfish 12 Angler

  4. #4
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    Apr 2013
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    Anthony,

    My fishing background prior to kayak angling was freshwater. I waded rivers and fished less frequently from boats in reservoirs. One of the things that intrigued me about kayak fishing is that I could use the same tackle, often the same lures and flies and essentially the same techniques (targeting structure and using currents to my advantage) for tidal fish as I did for freshwater fish.

    Now if you’re talking ocean fishing and/or surf fishing, I have not done either other than few offshore charter trips that I really did not enjoy. But from brackish creeks here in the Mid-Bay region to saltier waters at the mouth of the Chesapeake, to the flats in Tampa I find fishing fresh and salt waters remarkably similar. The skills and techniques required transfer nicely from one kind of water to the next.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
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    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
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  5. #5
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    Anthony- I take it you are kayak fishing- on the Salt side- medium spinning outfit with 12# braid- two feet of 20# monofilament leader- 1/4 oz. jighead with 3 inch Gulp mullet in white- cast or troll with medium retrieve just off the bottom- you will catch many different species- striped bass, croakers, speckled trout, redfish and white perch...my tackle is all high dollar, premium stuff, but you don't have to have it to be successful- a Penn Battle 3000 reel and a 7' Ugly Stick Lite medium action spinning rod will get the job done just fine...
    Last edited by ronaultmtd; 03-05-2017 at 08:51 AM.
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  6. #6
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    Mar 2016
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    Havre de grace, MD
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    To help you better, what type of saltwater fishing are you talking about Boat, Shore, Kayak? Each one can have a different method of fishing, different equipment, different lines/weight and leaders.
    Last edited by Oldbayrunner; 03-05-2017 at 08:47 AM.
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  7. #7
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    Mark, good info. I guess it's my ignorance in this area, but when I said "salt", I meant anything from the bay to off the coast of the Atlantic. I've been out on a few charters when I lived down in Tampa, so that is the extent of my experience in salt water.

    ronaultmtd, definitely helpful. Hearing from the few folks on here, I think a lot of what I have will be usable, but I still need to get some things.

    Oldbayrunner, I'm talking about getting out there in my kayak. I'd want to get after some rocks this spring, and maybe a trip or two out to the coast.
    Anthony

    Redfish 12 Angler

  8. #8
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    May 2010
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    Besides the Meet and Greets and asking questions, there are several authors that have some great books, YakFish, John Viel, and Mark .......... Hope I didn't miss anyone.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Memory Maker View Post
    Besides the Meet and Greets and asking questions, there are several authors that have some great books, YakFish, John Viel, and Mark .......... Hope I didn't miss anyone.
    Thank you very much!
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  10. #10
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    Oct 2012
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    Glen Burnie
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    Quote Originally Posted by whiskerfish View Post
    Mark, good info. I guess it's my ignorance in this area, but when I said "salt", I meant anything from the bay to off the coast of the Atlantic. I've been out on a few charters when I lived down in Tampa, so that is the extent of my experience in salt water.

    ronaultmtd, definitely helpful. Hearing from the few folks on here, I think a lot of what I have will be usable, but I still need to get some things.

    Oldbayrunner, I'm talking about getting out there in my kayak. I'd want to get after some rocks this spring, and maybe a trip or two out to the coast.
    Take the advice on the paddle tails for the upcoming spring if you want some rock. They are cheap and work. 1/4 to 3/4 oz jigheads and you are set. Any medium sized rod that can handle bass will do. No need to spend any money hardly at all. Get to the meet and greets and you will learn quickly many other techniques and strategies but still will find that the the ubiquitous paddle tail is many times the most productive lure.

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