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Thread: Yak trolling rod & reel?

  1. #11
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    Mar 2011
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    Wow, some good information in this thread.

    I just downloaded J. Veil's book from Amazon and it is awesome. It has reel and rod selection with trolling info. I would say worth the pennies for such vast information. I would have to learn through trial and error and it would cost so much money!

  2. #12
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    Jun 2011
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    3,880

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seasalt View Post
    Wow, some good information in this thread.

    I just downloaded J. Veil's book from Amazon and it is awesome. It has reel and rod selection with trolling info. I would say worth the pennies for such vast information. I would have to learn through trial and error and it would cost so much money!

    I'm glad to hear that you find the book to be helpful. After reading the book, you are likely to have more questions. Feel free to post them here (you will get different opinions, and that is a useful way to learn) or send pmails to me.
    John Veil
    Annapolis
    Native Watercraft Manta Ray 11 and Slayer Propel 10
    Member - Pro Staff team for Native Watercraft

    Author - "Fishing in the Comfort Zone" - light tackle fishing techniques for kayaks and small boats

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Salisbury, MD
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    I'm going to add to the smaller reel stance. The weight of the kayak is your "drag" and therefore allows kayak anglers to get away with lighter tackle and land the fish in the same amount of time. A few years ago while trolling around the CBBT, I ran into a tightly knotted school of 40-48" rockfish on the ocean front. I absolutely wore them out trolling (and casting) a 1oz. Storm swim shad on a Shimano Calcutta 201. That was my first introduction on how effective smaller gear can be on larger fish when you take into account the drag the kayak itself creates.

    The rod also plays an important component when fishing a larger fish. If I was expecting to hook into any fish over 40 inches, I would pair the reel with a MH to H (fast action) rod. The Shimano Teramar is a decently priced rod, but other less-expensive models such as the Ugly Stick Tiger Lite also work well. I think a few guys on here use those. The benefit of a stiffer rod (haha) is that it doesn't overly bend (which creates a yo-yo effect) and it forces the fish to pull your kayak or drag instead of simply bending the rod.

    Good luck in your search!
    ___________________________

    Hobie Fishing Team Member
    Survival Products, Salisbury, MD

    2017 Camo Hobie Outback
    2015 Olive Hobie Outback

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Glen Burnie
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    711

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmyz View Post
    Let me start by stating that I have been crabbing for 5 years on a yak and I made my traps from garden wire and my daughters noodle. So I am frugal and/or cheap. I do buy item of value when I research the purchase first. Like the Hobie yak. Used btw. The goal is to catch n eat rockfish spring summer and fall, so using a versatile rod and reel is desired. So do I want deep diving lures? Umbrella rigs? Tandems? Or buck tails on the top of the column? I have googled the reels and rods suggested above, the recommendations are greatly appreciated. The season is almost upon us so I need to make a decision. Do I buy two rod n reels at $400/each or continue to do it cheaply? Thanks again.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Go cheaply. Why in gods name would you need to spend $400 on a combo. Were not going after tuna and fishing from the kayak you can gear down quite a bit. Personally I don't even like heavy rods and try to stick to medium heavy or medium. $100 or less for a rod/reel combo will do all that you need from a kayak. Decent medium, or medium heavy rod and size 3000 or 4000 reel and you're set. I do understand the trophy season size fish could be a problem on lighter gear but being in the kayak gives you some great leeway in fighting them on lighter tackle and the same gear can be used all summer.

    PS I'll trade you four of my combos for $400. I'll make a little profit and you will have plenty of combos to fish with.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    New Windsor, MD Carroll County
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    251

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    I use a cheap rod and reels as well. Why spend $400 or even $200 on a setup?? I bring a 4 gallon pump sprayer with fresh water and just spray everything down when done. I live a hour plus from the bay and a sprayer is a cheap way to spray off my cheap set up.
    2017 Hobie Camo Outback
    2016 Vibe Sea Ghost

  6. #16
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    Feb 2011
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    Southern Maryland- Charles County
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    3,505

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    Like everything else- depends on your priorities- a cheap camera takes pictures so does a Leica...
    "Lady Luck" 2016 Red Hibiscus Outback
    "Wet Dream" 2011 yellow Ocean Prowler 13

  7. #17
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    Oct 2012
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    Glen Burnie
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    711

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronaultmtd View Post
    Like everything else- depends on your priorities- a cheap camera takes pictures so does a Leica...
    Hate to say it but it sometimes also depends on your budget. Food shelter and the family's future security always take priority. I appreciate nice gear and surely don't recommend something that it just going to cause frustration and aggravation. But there are some real values to be at surprisingly low price points if you are a careful consumer. I have some reels that I paid $25 for going on over ten years of moderate use with a good bit of abuse thrown in and they still work as well as day one. Some very very nice rods can be had in the $25-$75 range. A $400 reel is not going to bring any value to me. If anything being on the kayak and having the fear of losing it or damaging I'd find an aggravation. Rather have something that gets the job done just as well and that I can use and abuse and not worry about.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Abingdon, MD
    Posts
    731

    Default Yak trolling rod & reel?

    My take on deciding a price point is with emphasis on the intended task. When we troll on a yak we don't need a sensitive $100+ rod. My $30 BPS graphite series rods work great for trolling. With reels you can justify value for higher cost depending on durability, available drag and other features like a reliable line counter if so desired.


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    Mike

  9. #19
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    Apr 2013
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    Pasadena, MD
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    I’ve noted before on this forum that fishing equipment has improved greatly over the years of my angling experience (roughly 50) without a corresponding increase in price. I’ve seen it specifically in the improved smoothness and utility of spinning and baitcasting reels. Graphite rods were very expensive when they were introduced but are not so now.

    I believe for most of us who kayak fish, moderately priced gear will suffice and provide long service if maintained. I’d avoid big box store rod and reel combos if you want prolonged dependability. But the typical offerings from Bass Pro and Cabela’s (store brands and name brands) in the mid-price range are highly serviceable for the kinds of kayak fishing I do, mostly casting and some trolling.

    What I want most to avoid is equipment failure while I am on the water – a rod snapping, a guide breaking or a reel jamming. I’ve been doing well in that category so far. No breakdowns. Of course, that could be due to the fact that I rarely catch large fish! Legal-sized fish yes, but enormous ones, no.

    And I find that 2500 series spinning reels and light to medium light graphite rods work just fine for the trolling I do.

    The price ranges of my gear follows:

    Spinning rods and reels -- $175 combined.
    Baitcasting rods and reels -- $250 combined.
    Flyrods and reels (and lines) -- $200 to $600 combined. (Depends on weights and age -- my older fly rods actually cost more than my newer ones.)

    I am certain that even If I replaced my gear with more expensive combinations, I would not catch or boat more fish.
    Mark

    Slate Hobie Revolution 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  10. #20
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    Jul 2010
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    ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND
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    That is all good advice above. However, along with the bigger fish and the larger lures of the spring you need a rod with heavy enough an action to get a solid hook set with those larger hooks. Recently, one of the better rods that I have seen in the moderate price range is the Penn Battalion. You can find these in a conventional spool version or a spinning version, with the action to set hooks solidly. They are carbon fiber, light and with a line range that will suit the kayak troller. You could also not go wrong with the Shimano Teramar. I build my own rods and use a very heavy casting rod blank in the spring and a lighter casting blank in the fall. I prefer a conventional spool reel for either season. I am a spool and line counter. I like to know how far my lines are out and the conventional spool reels allow me a better estimate. I also lean toward longer rods in the 7 to 7.5 foot range. I like the arch that those rods provide. In a kayak they provide enough tension on the line to always keep up the slack. Sometimes with the shorter heavier rods, from a kayak, you will not keep pressure on the fish at all times. As mentioned earlier, it is different than trolling in a boat, where keeping pressure on the line is not a problem. Good luck with your selection.

    There is a huge difference in a quality rod. There is a completely different feel and sensitivity that the rod will provide. As I stated you want to match the proper rod to the style of fishing. My suggestion as to price is to buy the best and lightest rod that you can afford. As for the reel, it must be smooth and with not a lot of play in the handle and spool.
    Last edited by DOGFISH; 03-09-2017 at 07:14 AM.

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