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Thread: Keeping Fish

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    49

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    For fish between 20 and about 22 inches, I cut the gills with shears, hang them in the water for about 20 minutes to bleed out, then put them in a Sam's Club cooler bag ($10) with a bunch of ice so they stay fresh and I'm not dragging them around. I cooked one the other day from the fall that was just 24 inches or so and even it didn't taste nearly as good as those a little smaller. I use the same technique for anything I keep. Bleeding the fish makes for nice clean cuts and chilling the meat make cleaning easier in my opinion.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Salisbury, MD
    Posts
    1,001

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    I would suggest a catch bag of some sort. Hobie makes two sizes. Here is a video showing them. They fit nicely on the bow or stern of your kayak. I bought one for a large cobia, but have also used them for several smaller fish. It holds ice for quite some time and doesn't take up too much room on the bow of my Outback. It has a very heavy duty zipper, is made of thick material that will not tear, and is easy to clean.

    Wilderness Systems also came out with a catch bag. I do not know much about that one, but you can view it here.

    There are some DIY options out there as well if you do not want to spend $150 on a name brand cooler. They look like they use simple materials from auto parts store. I don't know how well they will work, but here is an example.

    IMO these options are much better than a stringer. Hanging your fish over the size is OK (so long as the water is cooler), but it creates a lot of drag and tends to get in the way. I prefer to bleed my fish out and get it on ice as soon as possible; especially if I have a long day on the water.
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  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Ocean City MD
    Posts
    133

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    Steve, I feel for you. I have kept many large stripers over the years. However once I started kayaking, it was more fun to catch fish than to catch big fish. I disagree with others here, I've have found no difference in the taste of a 44" striper over that of a 24" one. I used to troll in my powerboat but sold all & now kayak. The others are correct in that the larger fish are the primary spawners. A large cow striper can produce as much as 10x the eggs as a fish 1/2 that size. (and it doesn't matter when in the year you keep a big stiper, thats that many less eggs being produced.)
    But, you bought a license and are legally allowed to keep your limit. To the best of my knowledge & contrary to other's post the limits and sizes have not yet been set for this year. DNR's online post " See the online guide for season, size and creel info." Generally DNR will set the limits prior to April 15 ( a Saturday this year & there likely the fisrt day of the season.)

    Also larger fish contain greater amount of toxins. Smaller fish can be eaten more often & larger fish should not be eaten more than say once a month. All that means is that trace amounts of things like PCPs are in the muscle of the fish.

    To answer your question, I have a fish bag cooler & I freeze water bottles partially full & use them to drink or ice my fish.

    tight lines

    Don
    Red 2015 Hobie Outback
    Olive 2015 PA 14

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Bowie, MD
    Posts
    63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve6902 View Post
    Okay got it, let the big ones over 30" go, and don't post pics of me keeping a big fish or someone will be upset. Sooooo, how do you keep the under 30" fish in the yak?? I usually keep them on a stringer over the side. I'm kind of looking for some DIY ideas to keep them out of the water.
    Oh and for the record, I hunt to. Also do CDP's.
    I bleed them like Living the Dream because it reduces toxins seeping into the meat, and put them in a Seattle Sports Catch Cooler 20 which I got off of Amazon for $60. I generally don't keep anything that won't fit in that bag not because of conservationism, but they are too dang heavy to paddle around with all day. I've seen guy peddle back to put the large catches in the car, then go back out. Small fish on a stringer over the side.

    But most importantly, what is a CDP?
    Hobie Revo 13 (w/ graffiti removed)
    Ocean Kayak Trident 13

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Ocean City MD
    Posts
    133

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    It is expected that Md DNR egs will be similar to Potomac R regs. : http://prfc.us/sports/BLUE%20SHEET-2013.pdf
    1 fish per day > 35" beginning 4/15-5/15 then 1 fish > 20" & 1 over 28
    Red 2015 Hobie Outback
    Olive 2015 PA 14

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    New Windsor, MD Carroll County
    Posts
    209

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    22Tango, CDP is Crop Damage Permits. I usually kill anywhere between 30 and 60 deer a year. I hunt two different farms. And the farmers hate deer. No size limit there.
    2017 Hobie Camo Outback
    2016 Vibe Sea Ghost

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Hampstead, MD
    Posts
    609

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve6902 View Post
    22Tango, CDP is Crop Damage Permits. I usually kill anywhere between 30 and 60 deer a year. I hunt two different farms. And the farmers hate deer. No size limit there.
    I'm not sure if all that meat is already spoken for, but if you ever have any extra, I would gladly trade some rockfish fillets (or other fish fillets) for some.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
    Posts
    547

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    No need for all hate, good lord. While I do not personally keep very many fish there is nothing wrong with folks that do within the limits of the law. Recreational fisherman have virtually no impact on overall health of the bay. Commercial fisherman on the other hand, those are the guys to watch.

    Getting back to your question, generally I store fish in some type of cooler or in my livewell if they are small like perch. One trick I do have for bigger fish that I plan to release is to get them on my boga grips as quickly as possible, unhook, and then back in the water with the grips still attached. My bogas are attached to my boat using a retractor, so the fish can just swim along next to my boat while I fiddle with my camera or measuring board. This helps keep the fish calm and more likely to recover after I get my measurements and/or pictures. I've even used this system as a stringer to hold one fish that I plan to keep.

    In reference to your CDP permit, if you need any help with that please let me know. I'd love to come out and cull the herd.
    2015 Hobie Outback
    2001 Dagger Cayman

    John

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    OC Area
    Posts
    756

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    This is probably the reason I don't keep too many large fish from the kayak; no place to store it properly. I would think fish bags would be the way to go for large fish so you can fill it with ice and also fit the entire fish in there and don't risk ruining the meat. Or keep a large enough cooler in your vehicle and immediately bring the fish back to shore so you can throw it in there.

    I keep several a year 30" - 40" from the surf because I keep get them on ice right away and they taste just the same as schoolie sized fish. So don't worry about it "not tasting good". Anything over 40" I personally will release, but you can do as you see fit.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    219

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    Criticism from the same guys that exhaust cow stripers on light tackle and then release them... sometimes only to die a day or two later because they never recover.

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