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Thread: Fly Fishing Section

  1. #1
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    Default Fly Fishing Section

    I'm not sure how to go about this, but was wondering if the Administrator / Moderator / Owner of this site would consider creating a forum section for Fly Fishing?

    I really enjoyed my first year of extensive fly fishing action and was thinking that a fly fishing section might be helpful for users to share advice, trip reports, and fly patterns.

    Thank you,

    Tom

  2. #2
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    Feb 2014
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    I like the idea of it.

    eyedaddy

  3. #3
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    Apr 2013
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    Pasadena, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanMarino View Post
    I'm not sure how to go about this, but was wondering if the Administrator / Moderator / Owner of this site would consider creating a forum section for Fly Fishing?

    I really enjoyed my first year of extensive fly fishing action and was thinking that a fly fishing section might be helpful for users to share advice, trip reports, and fly patterns.

    Thank you,

    Tom
    I also think that this would be a good idea.

    There are nuances to flyfishing from a kayak that make it different than flyfishing on foot. I devoted a chapter to the topic in my book and I also wrote an article for the Chesapeake Kayak Anglers about it. You can see the article here:

    http://www.chesapeakebaykayakanglers...y-fishing.html

    I'm sure many questions arise during the year from those who flyfish from their kayaks or from those want to get started.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  4. #4
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    Manassas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark View Post
    I also think that this would be a good idea.

    There are nuances to flyfishing from a kayak that make it different than flyfishing on foot. I devoted a chapter to the topic in my book and I also wrote an article for the Chesapeake Kayak Anglers about it. You can see the article here:

    http://www.chesapeakebaykayakanglers...y-fishing.html

    I'm sure many questions arise during the year from those who flyfish from their kayaks or from those want to get started.
    You aren't kidding about the nuances.

    When on foot, and especially when wading, it isn't necessary to pay any attention to your slack line. Fly fishing on a kayak is a completely different story. A few weeks ago I noticed that I now have a habit of coiling the slack line in my off hand to prevent tangling on the deck. That's the first thing that comes to mind.

    Fly fishing from a kayak is very technical, in my opinion, and also very rewarding. A sub-forum specifically for fly fishing probably won't be the busiest section on the website, but it would definitely shine from time to time.
    2014 Hobie Pro Angler 12
    I need a good paddling

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Pasadena, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntrava View Post
    When on foot, and especially when wading, it isn't necessary to pay any attention to your slack line. Fly fishing on a kayak is a completely different story. A few weeks ago I noticed that I now have a habit of coiling the slack line in my off hand to prevent tangling on the deck. That's the first thing that comes to mind.
    Rule number one: Keep your deck clear so you can drop your line onto it without snagging tools or other tackle items.

    Rule number two: Toss your floating line over the side with your stripping hand as long as your drift doesn't float your kayak over the line.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Westminster, MD
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    It's funny this came up, I was just thinking about posting a few questions about kayak fly fishing on Monday. I haven't fly fished in 2 to 3 years. Once I started kayak fishing it was all about exploring new waterways. Now I'd like to get back into bringing back out the fly gear.


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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    columbia
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    Stripping basket!

    I honestly had to give up trying to fly fish from the canoe, the casting got too difficult sitting down, and my balance isn't good enough to stand and cast. I can hardly do it from shore or wading anymore. Bum shoulder…….
    40+ years of using the long stick took it's toll.
    But I would be willing in participating in a Fly Fishing Section.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Westminster, MD
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    Not to jack the thread but, for you all that chase striper on the fly...should I step up to a 10wt? I have a 8wt set up but need a reel for my 10wt rod. Also to make casting easier in a kayak do you step up one wt over the rod i.e. 8wt rod throw 9wt line?


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    Tan- Tarpon 140

  9. #9
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    columbia
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    10 wt. for the big Spring fish up on the flats, and where you are throwing the proverbial "half a chicken" wind resistant 6 inch Lefty Deceiver or Half and Half.
    8 or 9 wt. for schoolies in open water where there is no structure to have to pull the fish away from.

    Over lining is fine since you are making shorter casts. It will turn your lure over better.
    Or you could use something like the Wulff Triangle taper line, a heavy tapered head, with a long running line. You may have to adjust and slow down your casting motion.
    You aren't cranking up those 100 foot casts with a 10 wt. ( unless you are Joe Flacco).

  10. #10
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    I've never fished the flats. Having seen the photos of stripers caught there, I can see where a 10 wt. would come in handy.

    For stripers in my normal haunts in the Severn, Whitehall Bay and Goodhands I often carry two fly rods. I use an 8 wt. with intermediate or weight forward floating line for streamers, and a 9 weight with weight forward floating line to cast wind-resistant poppers. Both are 9 feet.

    On my trips to Tampa, I use the guide's 8 wt. with floating line to catch specks and ladyfish and other species. The 8 wt. has easily handled my catches there, including ladyfish well over 20 inches and some odd species of catfish.

    Note that On the fly (Harry) is very adept at using sinking line. The newer sinking lines are easier to cast than they used to be but I still prefer floating and intermediate lines.

    I've never tried over-lining or under-lining a rod. My 8 and 9 wts. handle schoolie stripers with ease as well as legal fish 20 to 24 inches. I've never caught a striper larger than that on the fly in my kayak but I'm sure those rods would subdue larger stripers if I got so lucky. The leverage and bend of a 9 foot rod would give me the advantage.

    I've caught schoolies with 4 and 5 wt. rods while fly fishing for white perch. The perch and especially a schoolie will give you a good tussle on those light rods.

    To make casting easier while seated in a kayak consider the length of the rod rather than line weight -- assuming you are casting flies appropriate to the weight of your line. The longer the rod the better in my opinion. A longer rod helps me to keep my backcast high while seated close to the water.

    As to casting length, a great benefit offered by kayaks is that they allow us to get close to the fish. You don't need to cast a fly line far to catch the typical fish we chase locally in our kayaks-- stripers, white perch, specks. I rarely throw more than 50 feet. That's very easy to do while seated.

    I do hope that more Snaggedliners try fly fishing. Harry and I need some competition at the September CBKA tournament in the fly division. We'd gladly turn over our string of titles to newcomers.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

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