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Thread: hobie revo vs outback to the bay bridge?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    4

    Default hobie revo vs outback to the bay bridge?

    Hey Everyone, I'm looking to add a hobie to my flotilla. I like the idea of hands free propulsion and I hear, they are easier to power forward in tides and wind. Would anyone care to share their experiences on the revo vs outback in these situations? I guess it comes down to more speed or stability. Secondly, Which would you prefer if you were paddling out to the bay bridge?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Burke, VA
    Posts
    131

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    Flyak,
    I think you may have already touched on the answers you will end up getting to this question: the Revolution is faster; the Outback is slower, but more stable.
    As to which one you should get, that will depend on what you want to do with it.
    You can fish successfully off both, but the Outback will allow for more storage.
    If you just want to cover more water while getting from Point A to B as quickly as possible, then the Revolution is the way to go.
    I have never pedaled or fished from an Outback, but many of the folks on this forum swear by them. I've even considered purchasing one so as to have an extra boat for family or friends.
    I have, however, left a fleet of Outback-laden fishermen in the proverbial dust when a flock of diving birds materializes on the horizon 3/4 of a mile away. In a max-effort sprint to the birds (slack current, very little wind) I was able to sustain a 4.8-5mph speed. This speed is of course unsustainable for many of us over a long period of time, but it's nice to know the Revo affords you that option if you so desire.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    -manny

    Hobie Outback
    Wilderness System 130T

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Arnold, MD
    Posts
    2,643

    Default

    I've fished out of both over the years and I can say that either will be perfectly capable for fishing the bridge. I'd say the outback has the advantage for holding position behind a piling and the revo has the strong advantage for pedaling through choppy water. Other advantages of the outback are the ability to stand up and fish, the high seat position, and the front rod holders.

    The outback will get you there no problem, but the way the bow is shaped causes the waves to slap and the revo cuts right through them. The Outback is wider and has greater primary stability than the revo as a result. This comes as a tradeoff because it it also heavier. The revo is narrower but your butt will be below the waterline and it has a ton of secondary stability. It will feel tippy but you can lean pretty far out on your hips in the Revo and it handles rough water like a champ.

    You say you have a floatilla, what kind of other kayaks do you have?

    I hope that helps a little. If you have additional questions don't hesitate to ask!
    Last edited by Redfish12; 02-29-2016 at 09:18 PM.
    Chesapeake Bay Kayak Anglers Co-Founder - www.chesapeakebaykayakanglers.com
    Hobie Local Kayak Fishing Team - Backyard Boats, MD


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
    Posts
    2,412

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    I've often thought the Revo doesn't get as much love as it deserves as a fishing boat on this forum because the Outback is so good.

    But I do love my Revo. I have never taken it to the Bay Bridge because that is not my kayak fishing style. (There are plenty of stripers willing to oblige in areas other than the Bay Bridge.) I prefer hugging shorelines or trolling through open waters. The Revo is great for both fishing styles and I suspect I expend less energy making it move than I would in an Outback. However, storage in a Revo is an issue. I solved that problem somewhat with A BlackPak. But the extra deck space of an Outback would be nice, especially when I fly fish.

    The Revo slices through the water beautifully and its low profile gives it great tracking in the wind. I actually can get mesmerized watching the bow cut through the chop. I also do not worry about its stability. I'm not cavalier about it but I've learned its capabilities in some big waves broadside, backside and head on. As long I keep my butt plastered to the seat I have no worries about stability. But that does bring another matter to forefront. I have an older model without the elevated seat. That means "wet butt" on trips when the water is choppy. In the summer it's actually cooling. But it can make the drive home a little damp. In the winter I don't notice it because of my Kokatat pants.

    Lastly, it's a relatively light pedal kayak. I can car-top it by myself, although help is always appreciated.

    Three cheers for the Revo!
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  5. #5

    Default

    Hey everyone,

    I am new to this whole kayak fishing.
    Since I don't go out on boats, I find myself somewhat limited in where I can throw my lines.
    So I bought myself a Hobie Mirage Pro Angler 14.
    That being said, I noticed nobody is mentioning anything about the Pro Angler series.

    I bought mine last October and can't wait to take it out on first chance this spring.


    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-N910A using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Glen Arm,MD
    Posts
    475

    Default

    Lots of former posts on this topic (search snaggedline outback vs revo)
    John Hostalka

    Ocean Kayak Trident 13
    2015 Hobie Outback

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Pasadena, MD
    Posts
    2,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hammercon View Post
    Hey everyone,

    I am new to this whole kayak fishing.
    Welcome to the forum.
    Mark

    Olive Hobie Revo 13
    Hidden Oak Native Ultimate 12

    Author: The Simple Joys of Kayak Fishing (Tips and Tales From an Old Guy in His Plastic Boat)
    Available on Amazon.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Chantilly, VA
    Posts
    1,432

    Default

    I agree with what Redfish12 and Mark described.

    I used Adventure. I have Revo and Outback currently If I keep only one kayak for fishing, I will keep Outback. Outback is a better fishing kayak to me. Because of my Youtube videos, future yakers asked me suggest kayaks for fishing. I have been suggesting Outback if they could afford a Hobie.

    Joe

    Joe
    Fish like there's no tomorrow.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Snow Hill, MD
    Posts
    339

    Default

    I have tried three of the Hobies (Outback, Revolution, and PA). There is no one perfect boat, each has it strengths and weakness. I did buy the Revolution, because for me it was the best tool for the type of fishing I do. I am 66 years old, and the vast majority of my fishing buddies are much younger and hard as nails. We do a lot of big water after big fish, and many days exceed 15 miles. The Revo with turbo fins is the great equalizer. I can hang with the young guns all day, and still have a little in the tank for loading the yak on top of a full size Ford Van. I have turtled twice in shallow water. Both times reaching to far back behind me in the high seat position, so don't that in deep water lol. I have been in some nasty 2-3 footers, and with the seat down, she handled it fine. The only time I was a little concerned was trying to out run a pop-up storm. The wind and waves were coming on the stern, and I was having to surf down the front of the waves, she was getting a little squirrely, so I don't recommend doing a lot of that either lol.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Odenton
    Posts
    814

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    I don't think there is a difference between the Outback and Revo for fishing the BB as mentioned above, they are both plenty capable. I started fishing the Bridge in a 10ft SinK and have used a Ocean Kayak Trident 13 & 15, Tarpon 120, Malibu Mini X and my Hobie Revo since. If I'm live lining at the Bridge, my favorite yak was the 10ft SinK. Drop a bait right next to a pilling, put the rob in a holder, and then use the kayak to position the bait in an eddy, around the piling to the next eddy, back and forth etc. A light and maneuverable kayak is great for this and when a fish takes a run around a piling you can chase 'em around. Trying to chase a Rockfish through the pilings with my Revo is damn near impossible but I do probably get there a little quicker than in my old SinK.

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